Identifying ADHD Over High Energy

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Children are full of life and energy. In fact, you want a healthy child to run around and be active with other children. However, for some parents, the line between energetic and ADHD becomes blurred. Despite the fact that many children grow out of this kind of hyper, talkative activity, a small percentage may not. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly 6.5 of school age children have been diagnosed with ADHD. Here are some of the signs parents should look for to see if their child has ADHD or is just an active, growing child: 

 

Where they are rowdy in all settings. Kids tend to wind themselves up in specific settings, so it’s not something to worry about if they’re suddenly very excited at a friend’s house or a playground they enjoy. That’s different from ADHD children, who are consistently hyperactive no matter where they are. Climbing and playing where it’s not appropriate, or difficulty playing quietly, could be troubling signs of ADHD.

 

When they will not accept discipline. Of course a child is going to disobey at some point, but for the most part, if they can handle taking a punishment from their parent, it’s not cause for concern. Even an abundantly naughty child will learn to respect boundaries if taught enough times. However, if they cannot show any self-control, no matter what kind of boundaries are set, then that’s a bigger issue. ADHD kids tend to be impulsive and lacking in self-control all the time, not just on occasion.

 

When they never stop, even for a second. All that running, jumping, and climbing is bound to where a child out. Kids with ADHD, on the other hand, always appear to be intensely active, all the time. Oftentimes, parents describe it as “exhausting,” since there is never a break when the child rests.

 

When their schoolwork is suffering. Due to the impulsive nature of ADHD, it’s extremely difficult for children to even follow easy directions. They often become disorganized, forgetful, and make careless mistakes, in part because they are easily distracted. This inability to focus on details make it even harder to complete schoolwork.

 

When they blurt out or interrupt. Kids with lots of energy may want to scream and shout at a party, but will quiet down at home when it’s time to rest. The impulse to shout out among ADHD kids is higher, as they have trouble controlling impulses overall.

 

If you notice any of these signs, talk with your child, teacher, and pediatrician about whether there is a possibility of ADHD. With different broad treatment plans available, there are lots of ways to help your  treat your child’s disorder, including combinations of stimulants and behavioral therapy. It’s also extremely important that you talk thoroughly with your physician about your child’s issues, as there are other things they could be diagnosed with that are not ADHD.

 

Author Bio: Nadia Osman is a freelance writer and blogger who writes about lots of different topics, including fertility and related topics for Cryo Bank.

Photo Credit: Mac Dor via Compfight cc

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What is the Connection Between Autism and ADHD?

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Autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are chronic health conditions that are becoming increasingly prevalent throughout the United States. There is currently no cure for either condition, and although the causes are not clear, recently medical experts have pointed out a possible connection between the two disorders.

 

Autism

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), estimates that 1 percent of children in the United States suffer from an autism spectrum disorder (ASDs). Autism is one type of disorder included in ASDs. More boys than girls are diagnosed with autism.

 

Autism is a developmental disorder that affects brain functions, it can be severely incapacitating. It is usually characterized by three specific symptom types:

·         problems related to verbal and non-verbal communication

·         impaired social interaction

·         limited interests and activities

These symptoms usually arise during the initial three years of childhood. They continue throughout life and there is currently no cure for this disorder.

 

A number of possible causes are often cited for autism but none of these have been clinically proven. These include:

·         changes in the digestive tract

·         diet

·         the body’s inability to metabolize vitamins and minerals

·         mercury poisoning

·         sensitivity to vaccines

 

ADHD

According to the CDC, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder affect around 5.2 million children in the United States between the ages of 3 and 17 years of age. This makes it the most commonly diagnosed childhood behavioral disorder. Like autism, it generally affects boys more often than girls.

 

ADHD creates problems with hyperactivity, inattentiveness and impulsivity. Although the disorder may run in families, the exact cause is unknown, but it appears to commence during the early stages of childhood, while the brain is still developing. Many children with ADHD also suffer from an additional behavioral or developmental problem such as bipolar disorder or depression.

 

Symptoms of ADHD fall into three categories:

 

·         inability to pay attention

·         over-activity

·         impulsive behavior

 

Links Between ADHD and Autism

 

Within the past two years, medical experts have discovered that autism and ADHD may have a lot more in common than a range of similar symptoms. The latest research reveals that they may be linked on a genetic level.

 

In spite of the fact that there is no overlap between the basic signs and symptoms of the two disorders, the behavioral differences can sometimes be so subtle that diagnosticians may often mistake one for the other. ADHD and autism also often occur in the same families.

 

Recent studies are beginning to reveal clues that suggest the two disorders share significant brain patterns, neuropsychological factors and risk variants. For the time being researchers are uncertain as to whether the same genes are responsible when the disorders occur separately or together in the same patient. More detailed research needs to be undertaken to find out the extent of the overlap, if any at all. As the link becomes more understood, this could dramatically affect both the diagnosis and treatment for autism and ADHD.

 

 

Corinna Underwood is a freelance writer based in Georgia. She specializes in health, parenting and cord blood.

 

Sources

http://www.healthofchildren.com/A/Autism.html

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/data.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002494/

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/adhd.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002518/

Photo Credit: Life Mental Health via Compfight cc

Why Sensory Breaks are Important in School

Colorful beams

Parents of children with autism or teachers with one or more autistic children in their classroom will appreciate that sometimes your child may display disruptive behavior or tunes out of what is going on in the classroom. There are several reasons why this may happen:

 

Sensory Overload

Your child may suddenly begin to display disruptive behavior if she becomes overwhelmed by sensory information. This can happen if other children are noisy, if the lights in the room are particularly bright, or if the stimulation has built up over several hours and your child has just reached his or her limit.

 

Social Triggers

Recess time and lunch time can be particularly hard for an autistic child, particularly if she finds it difficult to communicate with other children and has few friends. Often other children do not understand how to behave around an autistic child and you can help resolve any problems which may arise by asking your child’s teacher to talk to the class about autism.

 

Communication Issues

Your daughter may become frustrated because she is unable to communicate what she wants to either to a teacher. She may be trying to express that she is not feeling well or she may have a question about something related to the lesson and find she is unable to ask.

 

Boredom

Your child may tune out simply because she is not engaged by what the teacher is talking about.

 

Sensory Breaks in the Classroom

You may need to help your daughter’s teachers learn to recognize signs that indicate that your daughter needs a sensory break. Often she will become irritable, begin to fidget, show a lack of concentration and become easily upset. At this point a sensory break should be implemented straight away. Types of sensory break that are suitable for school include:

     Using activity boxes – these can structure specific activities in the classroom and help an autistic child stay on task.

     Implementing a 2-3 minute movement break—this can help a child to expend some energy and regroup.

     Providing fidget toys—these can help release restlessness.

     Utilizing timed activities—this can help a child to monitor her activities and see how much time she has left to complete a specific task.

 

Sensory Breaks at Home

Sensory breaks are equally important at home and somewhat easier to implement in your home environment. As soon as you begin to notice your child is overwhelmed, this is the right time to have a sensory break. At home you have many options. You can build the sensory breaks around your child’s needs and likes. Some popular ideas include:

 

     creating a quiet space with gentle lighting and soft cushions

     arranging your child’s favorite cuddly toys so that he or she can snuggle with them

     creating a play area with tactile substances such as sand, dough or clay

     spending time outdoors on a swing or trampoline

 

Whether you are a parent or a teacher living or working with autistic children, it is important to be able to recognize when the child needs a sensory break and to implement one immediately so as to avoid the creation of any disturbance or harm befalling the child.

 

 

Corinna Underwood is a freelance writer based in Georgia. She specializes in health, parenting and sperm donors.

 

Sources

http://parenting4specialneeds.com/blog/sensory-breaks-for-children-on-the-autistic-spectrum/

http://www.helpguide.org/harvard/autism_revolution.htm

http://nspt4kids.com/therapy/sensory-strategies-and-other-ideas-for-kids-with-autism/

What is the Connection Between Autism and ADHD?

Splashes approximating big

Autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are chronic health conditions that are becoming increasingly prevalent throughout the United States. There is currently no cure for either condition, and although the causes are not clear, recently medical experts have pointed out a possible connection between the two disorders.

 

Autism

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), estimates that 1 percent of children in the United States suffer from an autism spectrum disorder (ASDs). Autism is one type of disorder included in ASDs. More boys than girls are diagnosed with autism.

 

Autism is a developmental disorder that affects brain functions, it can be severely incapacitating. It is usually characterized by three specific symptom types:

·         problems related to verbal and non-verbal communication

·         impaired social interaction

·         limited interests and activities

These symptoms usually arise during the initial three years of childhood. They continue throughout life and there is currently no cure for this disorder.

 

A number of possible causes are often cited for autism but none of these have been clinically proven. These include:

·         changes in the digestive tract

·         diet

·         the body’s inability to metabolize vitamins and minerals

·         mercury poisoning

·         sensitivity to vaccines

 

ADHD

According to the CDC, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder affect around 5.2 million children in the United States between the ages of 3 and 17 years of age. This makes it the most commonly diagnosed childhood behavioral disorder. Like autism, it generally affects boys more often than girls.

 

ADHD creates problems with hyperactivity, inattentiveness and impulsivity. Although the disorder may run in families, the exact cause is unknown, but it appears to commence during the early stages of childhood, while the brain is still developing. Many children with ADHD also suffer from an additional behavioral or developmental problem such as bipolar disorder or depression.

 

Symptoms of ADHD fall into three categories:

 

·         inability to pay attention

·         over-activity

·         impulsive behavior

 

Links Between ADHD and Autism

 

Within the past two years, medical experts have discovered that autism and ADHD may have a lot more in common than a range of similar symptoms. The latest research reveals that they may be linked on a genetic level.

 

In spite of the fact that there is no overlap between the basic signs and symptoms of the two disorders, the behavioral differences can sometimes be so subtle that diagnosticians may often mistake one for the other. ADHD and autism also often occur in the same families.

 

Recent studies are beginning to reveal clues that suggest the two disorders share significant brain patterns, neuropsychological factors and risk variants. For the time being researchers are uncertain as to whether the same genes are responsible when the disorders occur separately or together in the same patient. More detailed research needs to be undertaken to find out the extent of the overlap, if any at all. As the link becomes more understood, this could dramatically affect both the diagnosis and treatment for autism and ADHD.

 

 

Corinna Underwood is a freelance writer based in Georgia. She specializes in health, parenting and cord blood.

 

Sources

http://www.healthofchildren.com/A/Autism.html

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/data.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002494/

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/adhd.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002518/

How to Choose a Sperm Donor

Couple

For heterosexual couples who are unable to conceive using the partner’s sperm, for women same-sex couples, or a single woman who desires to give birth to a child, sperm donation is an effective and safe option.

 

The pace to start is finding a good sperm bank. Your physician will be able to recommend one to you, or you may already know someone who has used one. You can also find out more information online from the American Infertility Association. You don’t necessarily have to look for a local sperm bank, because frozen sperm can be shipped safely anywhere throughout the United States.

 

Before you make your final choice do some background research into a number of different sperm banks so you can be sure of choosing the right one for you. Check out their websites and contact them for brochures and further written information. Make sure that the sperm banks you are considering are licensed and accredited. Medical professionals agree that the most reputable licensing programs are the New York State Department of Health and The American Association of Tissue Banks.     

 

Find out about medical testing within each facility. Sperm banks have a legal obligation to test all donors for genetic defects as well as hepatitis, HIV and other sexually transmittable diseases. They also make a thorough evaluation of every donor’s medical history. The American Society for Reproductive Medicine recommends that all sperm donations be frozen and placed in quarantine for six months after the initial HIV test. After the six month period a second HIV test is performed, to make sure that the sperm donor and his samples are healthy.

 

Here are some questions you should ask individual sperm banks when you are leaning how they operate.

 

·         How many sperm donors do they work with?

·         What age donors does the bank recruit?

·         What are the backgrounds of the donors?

·         In what way and at what time do donors give up their legal rights to a child conceived using their donated sperm?

·         How does the sperm bank maintain confidentiality?

 

When you have decided on a suitable clinic you will be ready to make a request for donor profiles. The facility should send you information about their donors’ age, race, ethnic background, physical traits, general health, education, occupational history, interests and hobbies. Many sperm banks will also provide photos of donors as a child and as an adult.

Once you have chosen a donor who’s profile and characteristics are most suited to you, ask for information on how often his sperm has been used in a successful pregnancy. There is a recommended limit which is intended to reduce the chances of a donor’s offspring ever meeting each other and conceiving children. The usual limit is ten.

FAQ For Sperm Donors

Leland in Profile

Becoming a sperm donor many not be as simple as you might think. There is usually a strict screening process to go through, to ensure the highest standard of service for the recipient. Here are some questions you may be wondering about sperm donation.

 

How do I become a sperm donor?

You begin the process by filling in our online application form.

 

Are there any basic requirements to becoming a CCB sperm donor?

Yes, there are a number of basic requirements to become a potential donor. You must be at least 5’ 9” tall and between the ages of 19 and 38. You must either be attending a university or have already earned a Bachelor’s or more advanced degree. You must be legally allowed employment in the United States. Meeting these basic requirements is just the first step on the road to becoming a potential sperm donor.

 

What happens if I meet the basic requirements?

After meeting the basic requirements you may be asked to take the next step, which is our screening process. It is this stage that will ultimately qualify you for our sperm donor program. 

 

What about my medical history?

You must be in good health. If you make it through to our screening process, we will require you to take a full physical examination, which will include a blood and semen test, genetic screening, screening for infectious diseases, an assessment of your family history and may also involve other evaluations. You may be required to take a follow-up examination after three or six months.

 

What things might disqualify me from becoming a sperm donor?

You may be disqualified from the program due to your family or medical history, if you have a low sperm count or your semen has poor motility, or if you test positive for genetic disorders or infectious diseases.

 

How long will it take me to become a qualified sperm donor?

It will take 3 months or more to complete the full screening process.

 

How often do I have to come to the sperm bank?

You must be prepared to make visits to the sperm bank 1-3 ties each week for at least six months, sometimes longer.

 

Will I get paid for my sperm donation?

The CCB pays $100 for each sperm donation. You may also receive bonuses for additional items such as photos or yourself as a baby or adult. You may also receive more money if you agree to become an “open donor.” This means that you agree to allow your offspring to contact you and get medical information when they become 18.

 

What if I have any other questions?

The fully qualified staff at the CCB will be there with you through every step of the screening process and the procedure of making a sperm donation. They will carefully and fully explain every stage and they will be more than happy to answer any specific question you have throughout the procedure.

 

 

 

 

 

Corinna Underwood is a freelance health writer who specializes in women’s health, parenting and sperm donors.

Bonding With your Newborn

First Day in the Open World

The non-verbal attachment bond between a newborn and its primary caregiver is a wonderful thing. A secure attachment bond involves emotional responses to your baby’s  sounds, gestures and movements. This relationship is vital in order for the child to feel safe and secure and for successful emotional, physical and social development. The unspoken bond will affect how your child will communicate, interact and form relationships for the rest of her life.

 

Though many people may think so, your baby is not attached to you simply because you gave birth to her. When an infant is developing in the womb, it has a nervous system that is completely independent from the mother. What makes you feel good is not necessarily the same thing that makes your baby feel good. This is why it’s important that you are sensitive to your infant’s emotional and behavioral cues so that you will learn to understand her individual needs.

 

Bonding between a mother and her baby happens instinctively. But secure attachment doesn’t happen automatically, no matter how much you love your child. It is an ongoing process which requires you to be able to manage your stress levels and to soothe and calm your infant when she is distressed.

 

Sometimes you may feel upset because you do not understand your baby’s needs all the time. Don’t panic, this is neither possible nor necessary. The important thing is that you are aware of moments when there is disconnection between you and your infant and you fix it as soon as you can. This will strengthen your relationship.

 

Don’t worry that your baby will be spoiled  if you respond to all her needs. The more responsive you are, the more secure she will feel. A regular response to your baby’s cues will create feelings of trust and security. Infants only form a secure attachment bond with one person, and that is the person who spends most time caring for them. However, they can develop loving connections with all of their caregivers.

 

A secure attachment with your infant is a two-way, constantly interactive process, in which you and your child simultaneously read each other’s cues. Even in the first moment of her life, your baby begins to notice your non-verbal cues, such as your gestures, your emotions and your tone of voice. She will respond with her own signals, like cooing, crying and imitating your facial expressions.

 

When your infant develops a secure attachment bond, it means she is able to:

 

·         develop fulfilling relationships throughout their life

·         keep their emotions balanced

·         feel self-confident

·         enjoy social activities

·         have the strength to recover from loss and disappointment

·         share their feelings and emotions

·         be able to ask for help or support

·         trust others

 

Creating a secure attachment with your newborn  means learning her cues. Watch her facial expression, notice how she touches and likes to be touched, familiarize yourself with the sounds she makes, and you and your infant will develop a lasting secure attachment.

 

Corinna Underwood is a freelance health writer who specializes in women’s health, parenting and cord blood.

Choosing Surrogate Parenting

Playing with light

In the United States, infertility affects more than seven million people. An estimated 12 percent of women who are childbearing age are infertile. This is one reason why a couple may consider surrogate parenting.

 

Choosing surrogate parenting is a big decision to make. It is also very expensive, but many parents are prepared to pay the price for the chance to have a child who is related to them genetically.

 

Northeast Assisted Fertility Group (NAFG) advises intended parents to prepare a budget of $100,000 to $120,000 to complete a surrogacy agreement. This total fee includes compensation for the surrogate parent, possible fees if a sperm donor is needed, in vitro fertilization procedures, counseling for the surrogate and the intended parents, expenses for the surrogate mother prior to the pregnancy (including lost salary, attorney fees and life insurance costs), medical expenses, attorney fees and travel expenses. If the surrogate mother does not have a health insurance policy, the intended parents are required to obtain one for her to cover her pregnancy.

 

People choose surrogacy for many different reasons. Some have a genetic defect that they do not wish to pass on to their children, others have a history of repeat miscarriages or are unable to carry a pregnancy to full-term. Gay male couples may also choose a surrogate parent if they prefer to have a genetic link to their children.

 

Surrogate mothers are usually between age 21 and 42 years old and have previously had a child. There are many reasons women choose to be surrogate mothers, aside from the financial advantages. Some choose surrogacy because they want to help an infertile couple realize the joy of parenting.

 

The surrogacy process begins with a consultation between the intended parents, their attorney, a psychologist, and the staff at the clinic facilitating the surrogacy. Once the intended parents have chosen a program, they are matched with a surrogate. The intended parents typically undergo a psychological evaluation and tests for sexually transmittable diseases. The financial aspects of the program are arranged with their attorney and an escrow account is set up to pay for the surrogate’s compensation and expenses.

 

Intended parents are shown profiles of potential surrogates from which to choose. When all parties agree the appropriate documents are signed with the help of an attorney, and medical procedures can begin.

 

U.S. laws on surrogacy vary from state to state. Some states who allow surrogacy only permit uncompensated agreements and others do not allow same-sex couples or unmarried couples from entering a surrogacy program. In certain states, intended parents can file a pre-birth order with the court when the pregnancy occurs—this allows for their names to be put on the baby’s birth certificate. In other states the surrogate’s name is put on the birth certificate and the intended mother must proceed with a step-mother adoption process in order to be recognized as the legal mother and have her name placed on the birth certificate.

 

 

 

 

 

Corinna Underwood is a freelance health writer who specializes in women’s health, parenting and Fertile-Future.

Cord Blood Banking FAQ

Children

Stem cells from umbilical cord blood are currently considered to be one of the best ways to protect the health of your child now and in the future. Many parents choose to collect and store cord blood so they can rest assured that should their child suffer illness, even in their adult life, they may be treated with these stem cells. Here are the answers to some of the questions you may have about cord blood banking.

 

What are the advantages of banking cord blood?

This procedure offers a safe and controversy-free means of acquiring stem cells for the future treatment of many diseases. Cord blood contains hematopoietic stem cells. This type of stem cell has the ability to generate specialized blood cells that can be used to treat disease and replace a wide array of cells.

 

What types of disease can be treated with cord blood stem cells?

There are currently more than 80 diseases that can be treated this way. These include sickle cell anemia, amyloidosis, osteoporosis and several types of leukemia.

 

How is cord blood collected?

The cord blood will be collected immediately after your child’s umbilical cord has been cut. It is drawn into a collection bag. FamilyCord will provide you will a complete collection kit for your healthcare provider to use.

 

Does the procedure involve any risk to me or my child?

Cord blood collection is completely safe for you and your baby. There will be no need to change your planned birth process. Your healthcare provider will collect the cord blood as soon as your baby’s umbilical cord has been clamped and cut. If you are having a C-section delivery, this is not a problem. Your FamilyCord collection kit contains a sterile C-section kit. The collection process takes around 8-10 minutes.

 

Is the amount of cord blood collected important?

It is important; the greater the quantity of blood, the greater the number of stem cells. This also improved the medical outcomes when the cells are needed for transplantation.  

 

Where will my stem cells be stored?

After collection the collection kit will be returned to you or a family member. All it takes is one phone call and out professional medical courier will collect it from the hospital. It will be taken to and stored in FamilyCord’s secure storage laboratory in Los Angeles, California. The facility is designed especially with safety and protection in mind.

 

What happens when I need my cord blood sample?

If your sample is ever needed, FamilyCord will liaise with your doctor to arrange confirmatory testing, release, and transportation of your baby’s stem cells to a designated hospital.

 

How much experience does FamilyCord have with cord blood banking?

FamilyCord has 15 years of experience storing cord blood. The company is FDA registered, AABB accredited, and CLIA certified. FamilyCord is owned and operated by physicians and we have a qualified stem-cell transplant physician serving as one of our medical directors. FamilyCord has received a rating of “A+” by the Better Business Bureau.

Diet During Pregnancy

low carb

Eating healthily during pregnancy is important for your heath and the normal development of your growing child. Even if you already have a balanced diet you will need to tweak it a little when you become pregnant so that you have more of the nutrients that keep your strong and full of energy and will help your child grow.

 

What to Add

Generally pregnant women require more protein. This is because protein is made up of amino acids that lay the foundation for all your body’s cells and those of your baby. It’s vital that you get enough protein during your pregnancy, particularly through the second and third trimesters because this is when you baby is developing at a faster rate and your organs and breasts are increasing in size to accommodate your child’s needs. Pregnant women need about 70 grams of protein each day, in comparison to women who are not pregnant, who require around 45 grams daily.

 

Folic acid is another important nutrient that is vital during pregnancy because it reduces the risk of your baby developing a neural tube defects—defects of the spinal cord and brain—such as spina bifida or anencephaly. Medical experts recommend that women take 400 micrograms each day while you are trying to conceive and during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. This is due to the fact that neural tube defects develop during the first 28 days of pregnancy. Folic acid may be taken as a supplement. Natural sources of folic acid include beans, nuts, green leafy vegetables and citrus fruits.

 

Another important nutrients for pregnant women are iron and calcium. Iron is needed for the transportation of oxygen to the mother’s and baby’s tissues and organs. Pregnant women need 27 milligrams of iron in their daily diet, whereas non-pregnant women need only 18 milligrams. Natural sources of iron include spinach, soybeans, pumpkin seeds, molasses and lentils.

 

Calcium is essential for the healthy development of the child’s bones and teeth and it also protects the mother’s bone density. Pregnant women require 1,000 milligrams of calcium a day. Calcium can be obtained from milk, oatmeal, almonds, collard greens and sesame seeds

 

What to Avoid

Pregnant women should avoid uncooked seafood such as sushi, sashimi and oysters in order to avoid contracting an infection from the parasites that live in raw fish. Moms-to-be should also cut out unpasteurized milk and cheeses made from it, such as Camembert and Brie, or blue-veined cheeses like Stilton and Gorgonzola because they carry a risk of bacterial infection from listeria, which can be very dangerous for pregnant women and their unborn babies. Alcohol and cigarettes are obvious no-no’s, and should also keep caffeine to a minimum, as studies show that women who consume in excess of 200 milligrams of caffeine each day are more likely to suffer a miscarriage than those who consume less.

 

 

 

Corinna Underwood is a freelance health writer who specializes in women’s health, parenting and cord blood banking.