Identifying ADHD Over High Energy

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Children are full of life and energy. In fact, you want a healthy child to run around and be active with other children. However, for some parents, the line between energetic and ADHD becomes blurred. Despite the fact that many children grow out of this kind of hyper, talkative activity, a small percentage may not. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly 6.5 of school age children have been diagnosed with ADHD. Here are some of the signs parents should look for to see if their child has ADHD or is just an active, growing child: 

 

Where they are rowdy in all settings. Kids tend to wind themselves up in specific settings, so it’s not something to worry about if they’re suddenly very excited at a friend’s house or a playground they enjoy. That’s different from ADHD children, who are consistently hyperactive no matter where they are. Climbing and playing where it’s not appropriate, or difficulty playing quietly, could be troubling signs of ADHD.

 

When they will not accept discipline. Of course a child is going to disobey at some point, but for the most part, if they can handle taking a punishment from their parent, it’s not cause for concern. Even an abundantly naughty child will learn to respect boundaries if taught enough times. However, if they cannot show any self-control, no matter what kind of boundaries are set, then that’s a bigger issue. ADHD kids tend to be impulsive and lacking in self-control all the time, not just on occasion.

 

When they never stop, even for a second. All that running, jumping, and climbing is bound to where a child out. Kids with ADHD, on the other hand, always appear to be intensely active, all the time. Oftentimes, parents describe it as “exhausting,” since there is never a break when the child rests.

 

When their schoolwork is suffering. Due to the impulsive nature of ADHD, it’s extremely difficult for children to even follow easy directions. They often become disorganized, forgetful, and make careless mistakes, in part because they are easily distracted. This inability to focus on details make it even harder to complete schoolwork.

 

When they blurt out or interrupt. Kids with lots of energy may want to scream and shout at a party, but will quiet down at home when it’s time to rest. The impulse to shout out among ADHD kids is higher, as they have trouble controlling impulses overall.

 

If you notice any of these signs, talk with your child, teacher, and pediatrician about whether there is a possibility of ADHD. With different broad treatment plans available, there are lots of ways to help your  treat your child’s disorder, including combinations of stimulants and behavioral therapy. It’s also extremely important that you talk thoroughly with your physician about your child’s issues, as there are other things they could be diagnosed with that are not ADHD.

 

Author Bio: Nadia Osman is a freelance writer and blogger who writes about lots of different topics, including fertility and related topics for Cryo Bank.

Photo Credit: Mac Dor via Compfight cc

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What is the Connection Between Autism and ADHD?

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Autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are chronic health conditions that are becoming increasingly prevalent throughout the United States. There is currently no cure for either condition, and although the causes are not clear, recently medical experts have pointed out a possible connection between the two disorders.

 

Autism

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), estimates that 1 percent of children in the United States suffer from an autism spectrum disorder (ASDs). Autism is one type of disorder included in ASDs. More boys than girls are diagnosed with autism.

 

Autism is a developmental disorder that affects brain functions, it can be severely incapacitating. It is usually characterized by three specific symptom types:

·         problems related to verbal and non-verbal communication

·         impaired social interaction

·         limited interests and activities

These symptoms usually arise during the initial three years of childhood. They continue throughout life and there is currently no cure for this disorder.

 

A number of possible causes are often cited for autism but none of these have been clinically proven. These include:

·         changes in the digestive tract

·         diet

·         the body’s inability to metabolize vitamins and minerals

·         mercury poisoning

·         sensitivity to vaccines

 

ADHD

According to the CDC, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder affect around 5.2 million children in the United States between the ages of 3 and 17 years of age. This makes it the most commonly diagnosed childhood behavioral disorder. Like autism, it generally affects boys more often than girls.

 

ADHD creates problems with hyperactivity, inattentiveness and impulsivity. Although the disorder may run in families, the exact cause is unknown, but it appears to commence during the early stages of childhood, while the brain is still developing. Many children with ADHD also suffer from an additional behavioral or developmental problem such as bipolar disorder or depression.

 

Symptoms of ADHD fall into three categories:

 

·         inability to pay attention

·         over-activity

·         impulsive behavior

 

Links Between ADHD and Autism

 

Within the past two years, medical experts have discovered that autism and ADHD may have a lot more in common than a range of similar symptoms. The latest research reveals that they may be linked on a genetic level.

 

In spite of the fact that there is no overlap between the basic signs and symptoms of the two disorders, the behavioral differences can sometimes be so subtle that diagnosticians may often mistake one for the other. ADHD and autism also often occur in the same families.

 

Recent studies are beginning to reveal clues that suggest the two disorders share significant brain patterns, neuropsychological factors and risk variants. For the time being researchers are uncertain as to whether the same genes are responsible when the disorders occur separately or together in the same patient. More detailed research needs to be undertaken to find out the extent of the overlap, if any at all. As the link becomes more understood, this could dramatically affect both the diagnosis and treatment for autism and ADHD.

 

 

Corinna Underwood is a freelance writer based in Georgia. She specializes in health, parenting and cord blood.

 

Sources

http://www.healthofchildren.com/A/Autism.html

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/data.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002494/

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/adhd.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002518/

Photo Credit: Life Mental Health via Compfight cc

Why Sensory Breaks are Important in School

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Parents of children with autism or teachers with one or more autistic children in their classroom will appreciate that sometimes your child may display disruptive behavior or tunes out of what is going on in the classroom. There are several reasons why this may happen:

 

Sensory Overload

Your child may suddenly begin to display disruptive behavior if she becomes overwhelmed by sensory information. This can happen if other children are noisy, if the lights in the room are particularly bright, or if the stimulation has built up over several hours and your child has just reached his or her limit.

 

Social Triggers

Recess time and lunch time can be particularly hard for an autistic child, particularly if she finds it difficult to communicate with other children and has few friends. Often other children do not understand how to behave around an autistic child and you can help resolve any problems which may arise by asking your child’s teacher to talk to the class about autism.

 

Communication Issues

Your daughter may become frustrated because she is unable to communicate what she wants to either to a teacher. She may be trying to express that she is not feeling well or she may have a question about something related to the lesson and find she is unable to ask.

 

Boredom

Your child may tune out simply because she is not engaged by what the teacher is talking about.

 

Sensory Breaks in the Classroom

You may need to help your daughter’s teachers learn to recognize signs that indicate that your daughter needs a sensory break. Often she will become irritable, begin to fidget, show a lack of concentration and become easily upset. At this point a sensory break should be implemented straight away. Types of sensory break that are suitable for school include:

     Using activity boxes – these can structure specific activities in the classroom and help an autistic child stay on task.

     Implementing a 2-3 minute movement break—this can help a child to expend some energy and regroup.

     Providing fidget toys—these can help release restlessness.

     Utilizing timed activities—this can help a child to monitor her activities and see how much time she has left to complete a specific task.

 

Sensory Breaks at Home

Sensory breaks are equally important at home and somewhat easier to implement in your home environment. As soon as you begin to notice your child is overwhelmed, this is the right time to have a sensory break. At home you have many options. You can build the sensory breaks around your child’s needs and likes. Some popular ideas include:

 

     creating a quiet space with gentle lighting and soft cushions

     arranging your child’s favorite cuddly toys so that he or she can snuggle with them

     creating a play area with tactile substances such as sand, dough or clay

     spending time outdoors on a swing or trampoline

 

Whether you are a parent or a teacher living or working with autistic children, it is important to be able to recognize when the child needs a sensory break and to implement one immediately so as to avoid the creation of any disturbance or harm befalling the child.

 

 

Corinna Underwood is a freelance writer based in Georgia. She specializes in health, parenting and sperm donors.

 

Sources

http://parenting4specialneeds.com/blog/sensory-breaks-for-children-on-the-autistic-spectrum/

http://www.helpguide.org/harvard/autism_revolution.htm

http://nspt4kids.com/therapy/sensory-strategies-and-other-ideas-for-kids-with-autism/

What is the Connection Between Autism and ADHD?

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Autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are chronic health conditions that are becoming increasingly prevalent throughout the United States. There is currently no cure for either condition, and although the causes are not clear, recently medical experts have pointed out a possible connection between the two disorders.

 

Autism

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), estimates that 1 percent of children in the United States suffer from an autism spectrum disorder (ASDs). Autism is one type of disorder included in ASDs. More boys than girls are diagnosed with autism.

 

Autism is a developmental disorder that affects brain functions, it can be severely incapacitating. It is usually characterized by three specific symptom types:

·         problems related to verbal and non-verbal communication

·         impaired social interaction

·         limited interests and activities

These symptoms usually arise during the initial three years of childhood. They continue throughout life and there is currently no cure for this disorder.

 

A number of possible causes are often cited for autism but none of these have been clinically proven. These include:

·         changes in the digestive tract

·         diet

·         the body’s inability to metabolize vitamins and minerals

·         mercury poisoning

·         sensitivity to vaccines

 

ADHD

According to the CDC, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder affect around 5.2 million children in the United States between the ages of 3 and 17 years of age. This makes it the most commonly diagnosed childhood behavioral disorder. Like autism, it generally affects boys more often than girls.

 

ADHD creates problems with hyperactivity, inattentiveness and impulsivity. Although the disorder may run in families, the exact cause is unknown, but it appears to commence during the early stages of childhood, while the brain is still developing. Many children with ADHD also suffer from an additional behavioral or developmental problem such as bipolar disorder or depression.

 

Symptoms of ADHD fall into three categories:

 

·         inability to pay attention

·         over-activity

·         impulsive behavior

 

Links Between ADHD and Autism

 

Within the past two years, medical experts have discovered that autism and ADHD may have a lot more in common than a range of similar symptoms. The latest research reveals that they may be linked on a genetic level.

 

In spite of the fact that there is no overlap between the basic signs and symptoms of the two disorders, the behavioral differences can sometimes be so subtle that diagnosticians may often mistake one for the other. ADHD and autism also often occur in the same families.

 

Recent studies are beginning to reveal clues that suggest the two disorders share significant brain patterns, neuropsychological factors and risk variants. For the time being researchers are uncertain as to whether the same genes are responsible when the disorders occur separately or together in the same patient. More detailed research needs to be undertaken to find out the extent of the overlap, if any at all. As the link becomes more understood, this could dramatically affect both the diagnosis and treatment for autism and ADHD.

 

 

Corinna Underwood is a freelance writer based in Georgia. She specializes in health, parenting and cord blood.

 

Sources

http://www.healthofchildren.com/A/Autism.html

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/data.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002494/

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/adhd.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002518/